Sunday, 17 December 2017

Canada 150 - The Quebec Garrison Club








During our country's 150th anniversary celebration of confederation I will write posts titled Canada 150 with a link to a publication or website I find that may help you tell the story of your Canadian ancestors.
Click on the Canada 150 label on the right or at the bottom to see all the posts.




Today I have for you...

The Quebec Garrison Club





The Quebec Garrison Club was established as a social club on 11 September 1879 by French and English military officers that were stationed in Quebec City. It remains today a members-only club. 
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Relevant Links




Friday, 15 December 2017

High Fives - December 15, 2017






High Fives are articles or blog posts I have read during the week that I find interesting, and perhaps are pertinent to my research. Sometimes there are only a couple and sometimes there are quite a few.



~by Candice McDonald at Finding Your Canadian Story
Since my husband’s ancestors were in the fur trade, I have been over this site many times.  Still, Candi managed to show me parts of the site I have never visited. Thanks!


~by Amelia Soth at JSTOR Daily
Interesting post about a 17th Century sign language


~by Sharn White on Family History 4U
Informative post on Cause Papers. I never heard of them! Use the advanced search to stick to a county.


New Content and LAFRANCE Update on Genealogy Quebec
~by InstitutDruin at Généalogie Québec
~by Gail Dever at Genealogy à la carte
I was waiting to publish today so I could add this post by Gail… I didn’t want anyone to miss it.  





For more exciting weekend reading, see what posts these bloggers liked...

Saturday – Gail Dever, Crème de la Crème

Sunday – Randy Seaver, Best of the Genea-Blogs





Wednesday, 13 December 2017

Alberta Medical Register






During our country's 150th anniversary celebration of confederation I will write posts titled Canada 150 with a link to a publication or website I find that may help you tell the story of your Canadian ancestors.
Click on the Canada 150 label on the right or at the bottom to see all the posts.





Today I have for you...


The Alberta medical Register


1911

The Alberta Medical Register was published by the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Alberta




Relevant Links






Monday, 11 December 2017

Database of London's Livery Companies




The project began in 2008 with creating the database of the Clothworkers' Company, Apprenticeship and Freeman records, and has since added ten other companies. 




Most worshipful companies of trades started as an association of artisans that set regulations for the trade, kept track of the doings of apprenticeships and masters, and paid for funerals. Many are now social and charitable associations.    




Relevant Links




Sunday, 10 December 2017

Canada 150 - Winnipeg War Sketches






During our country's 150th anniversary celebration of confederation I will write posts titled Canada 150 with a link to a publication or website I find that may help you tell the story of your Canadian ancestors.
Click on the Canada 150 label on the right or at the bottom to see all the posts.




Today I have for you...


Winnipeg War Sketches 1885




Images, names of killed, wounded and prisoners, and sketches of some officers. 



Relevant Links




Friday, 8 December 2017

High Fives - December 8, 2017



High Fives are articles or blog posts I have read during the week that I find interesting, and perhaps are pertinent to my research. Sometimes there are only a couple and sometimes there are quite a few.


Several posts and news clips this week were honouring the victims of the Halifax Explosion that occurred a hundred years ago on December 6, 1917. My great uncle Wilfred Tait may have been there to witness it, or perhaps to help in the aftermath, as he was in the Navy Reserves at that time. 

Here are some of the posts for the anniversary of the disaster.



~by Meghan Groff at Halifax Today


~by Valerie Casbourn at Library and Archives Canada Blog


~by Gail Dever at Genealogy à la Carte


~by James Sullivan at Boston Globe Magazine


~by Dan Conlin at The Marine Curator



Because the explosion at Halifax is more globally known, it tends to overshadow another anniversary - that of the Massacre at l'École Polytechnique de Montréal, December 6, 1989. Here are a couple of posts written by those who honoured these victims...


~by John D Reid at Canada’s Anglo-Celtic Connections


~by Heather Barnabe at Huffington Post



I hope you have read down this far, because this is pretty good news for those who have ancestors from Paris, France...

~by Anne Morddel at The French Genealogy Blog






For more exciting weekend reading, see what posts these bloggers liked...

Saturday – Gail Dever, Crème de la Crème

Sunday – Randy Seaver, Best of the Genea-Blogs





Wednesday, 6 December 2017

Canada 150 - Bay of Quinte, Ont






During our country's 150th anniversary celebration of confederation I will write posts titled Canada 150 with a link to a publication or website I find that may help you tell the story of your Canadian ancestors.
Click on the Canada 150 label on the right or at the bottom to see all the posts.




Today I have for you...


Pioneer life on the Bay of Quinte, Ontario





With genealogies of some early families.



Relevant Links





Sunday, 3 December 2017

Canada 150 - Manitoba Papers Name Ancestors






During our country's 150th anniversary celebration of confederation I will write posts titled Canada 150 with a link to a publication or website I find that may help you tell the story of your Canadian ancestors.
Click on the Canada 150 label on the right or at the bottom to see all the posts.





Today I have for you...

Manitoba Sessional Papers of 1915
Reveal 
Deaf Students, Brand Registers and Stallion Owners





Looking at the list of papers for the 1915 Sessional Papers, we see that a lot of reports were not printed.. like No.67, names of teachers of the Polish and Ruthenian schools. Or No.73, the name, address and age of 29 students that were truant in 1913-1914. But there were printed three interesting reports that give names of Manitoba ancestors. 

One was No. 10, Report of the Department of Public Works which, oddly enough, not only gave statistics on public buildings such as the Insane Asylum (take a look at the discharge  stats) and the schools, but also included a list of students that attended the school of the deaf. Listed are name, residence, date admitted and cause of deafness.




Next we scroll to No.13 for the Department of Agriculture, which gives a list of Cattle Brands and who they are registered to. 




Going a little further we see a Registration of Stallion with their owners' name and residence.  This one you may want to use the Search bar at top right, as the list is sorted by name of Stallion, not owner.



You never know when you are going to find you ancestors in the Sessional Papers. 



Relevant Links








Friday, 1 December 2017

High Fives - December 1, 2017



High Fives are articles or blog posts I have read during the week that I find interesting, and perhaps are pertinent to my research. Sometimes there are only a couple and sometimes there are quite a few.




~by Diahan Southard at Genealogy Gems
The ins and outs of opting in or out. 


~by DiAnn Iamarino Ohama at Fortify Your Family Tree
Follow the links to DiAnn's previous posts whew she explains about it, then download this cool piece of software for windows, where it says windows download:  
I was able to download it here and here. A new family tree toy!



~by Meghan Groff at Halifax Today
Dr. Halstead will build on available data to tell the stories of the victims and their families.





For more exciting weekend reading, see what posts these bloggers liked...

Saturday – Gail Dever, Crème de la Crème

Sunday – Randy Seaver, Best of the Genea-Blogs






Wednesday, 29 November 2017

Canada 150 - Ontario Institutes for Deaf, Mute and Blind






During our country's 150th anniversary celebration of confederation I will write posts titled Canada 150 with a link to a publication or website I find that may help you tell the story of your Canadian ancestors.
Click on the Canada 150 label on the right or at the bottom to see all the posts.





Today I have for you...


Ontario Institute for the Deaf and Dumb


1906 Convention of Graduates


In June of 1906 a Convention of Graduates was held at the Ontario Institute for the Deaf and Dumb. Many former pupils attended and a list of names, where they were from and their current occupation, was published in the Ontario Sessional Papers for 1907 by the Department of Education.




The Education minister's report on the Institute for the Deaf starts on page 411 and you can see names of staff and teachers, courses taught, etc. There are portraits of four students who won medals. 

There are also names of students registered for 1906, and those that took examinations in Articulation classes, with their age and their marks. See links below.



Ontario Institute for the Blind

In the same Sessional Papers is a report on the Institute for the Education of the Blind which starts on page 330



Scrolling through you will see names of students registered, names of students who passed their exams successfully and names of teachers and staff.





Relevant Links



Monday, 27 November 2017

Look in more than one city newspaper for news



My 2x great grandfatherJohn Seale died in Kingston, Ontario in 3 April 1892. I found a small notice in the Kingston paper, as expected, which gave the date of death, his age and funeral arrangements.


SEALE- In Pittsburgh, April 3rd, John Seale aged 84 years.The funeral will take place on Wednesday morning at ten o'clock from his late residence, Front Road, to Cataraqui cemetery.  Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend. 

It's neither here nor there, but he was actually 85.

I decided to take a look at other city papers and found this item in a Toronto newspaper, not under the BMD notices, but under Kingston News.. notes. This one gives us a bit more insight into the character of John. 



  
   
My great grand aunt's husband was a locomotive engineer, and when he died in August 1914 his burial record said he died in a railway accident. All I know was that he was living around Chaudiere Station, Quebec City at the time.  So I went to Google Newspaper Archives and went through all the newspapers from around Quebec City that had available issues for that date.  I finally found the story that he died in the Quebec Daily Telegraph, which led me to find the story of the accident in L'Action Sociale.


Sometimes you find a local newspaper for that time, but it is mostly unreadable, like this issue from April 1916 when my grandfather's brother, Alex Mavor, died in WWI.




Several newspapers published casualty lists and I found Alex's name in the Winnipeg newspaper.  





So if you don't find an article or notice that you're looking for locally, try another city's newspaper. 




Sunday, 26 November 2017

Canada 150 - Saskatchewan Settlers and Soldiers






During our country's 150th anniversary celebration of confederation I will write posts titled Canada 150 with a link to a publication or website I find that may help you tell the story of your Canadian ancestors.
Click on the Canada 150 label on the right or at the bottom to see all the posts.





Today I have for you...


Settlements in Saskatchewan





Names of settlers of Saskatchewan in the late 1800s ...








...and names of soldiers who fought at Duck Lake in 1885






Relevant Links




Detailed report upon all claims to land and right to participate in the North-West Half-Breed Grant by settlers along the South Saskatchewan and vicinity, west of Range 26, W. 2nd Meridian, being the settlements commonly known as St. Louis de Langevin, St. Laurent or Batoche, and Duck Lake – 1886...



(Rapport détaillé sur toutes les demandes de terrains : et du droit de participer aux concessions de terres faites aux Métis du Nord-Ouest : présentées par les colons établis sur la Saskatchewan-Sud et dans les environs à l'ouest du rang 26, à l'ouest du 2e méridien : ces établissements étant ceux généralement connus sous les noms de Saint-Louis de Langevin, Saint-Laurent ou Batoche, et Lac-aux-Canards)








Friday, 24 November 2017

High Fives - November 24, 2017




High Fives are articles or blog posts I have read during the week that I find interesting, and perhaps are pertinent to my research. Sometimes there are only a couple and sometimes there are quite a few.





~by Valmay at Families in British India Society
If you have British ancestors that went back and forth to India, this is a good site for research. They have added more to their database of arrival and departure notices from the newspapers.


~by Marian B. Wood at Climbing my Family Tree
Marian discusses new operators for searching with google.


~by Gail Dever at Genealogy à la carte
A chance for Canadian genealogists to have input for the next census. Use the maximum number of words in the comments to make your case. 


~by Yvonne Seale, Making Women Matter, One Medieval Manuscript at a Time
Yvonne talks turkey. 


~by Donna Moughty at Donna’s Irish Genealogy Resources
Knowing your family medical history can save a life!







For more exciting weekend reading, see what posts these bloggers liked...

Saturday – Gail Dever, Crème de la Crème

Sunday – Randy Seaver, Best of the Genea-Blogs