Friday, 20 October 2017

High Fives - October 20, 2017




High Fives are articles or blog posts I have read during the week that I find interesting, and perhaps are pertinent to my research. Sometimes there are only a couple and sometimes there are quite a few.



~by Rebecca Murray at Library and Archives Canada Blog
Rebecca tells how to find the records at LAC for maritime pilots.  You may also find them listed in the Sessional Papers


~by John at John Grenham – Irish Roots
I can imagine that some immigrants to Canada and the US felt the same way, not knowing our language.


~by DiAnn Iamarino Ohama at Fortify Your Family Tree
More organization tips from DiAnn. I’ve been haphazardly doing something like this for a long time, but this is a better, simpler method to use.


Celebrating 85 years of student journalism
~by Liam Dowd at University of Glasgow Blog
Use the link at the bottom to go to the Glasgow Guardian archives, then choose a date in the left column.


British and Irish Furniture Makers Online
~by John D Reid at Canada's Anglo-Celtic Connections
John points us to a website with a database of furniture makers and the Worshipful Company of Joiners and Ceilers. 








For more exciting weekend reading, see what posts these bloggers liked...

Saturday – Gail Dever, Crème de la Crème

Sunday – Randy Seaver, Best of the Genea-Blogs



Wednesday, 18 October 2017

Canada 150 - Fish and Game Clubs






During our country's 150th anniversary celebration of confederation I will write posts titled Canada 150 with a link to a publication or website I find that may help you tell the story of your Canadian ancestors.
Click on the Canada 150 label on the right or at the bottom to see all the posts.

Today I have for you...



Fishing Clubs

The Caledon Mountain Trout Club


The Caledon Mountain Trout Club was established as a private club in 1901 in the Region of Peel, Ontario. See back for list of members.

Tuesday, 17 October 2017

The Automobile Industry



My Dad always bought second and third hand cars, and always from the same dealer near our home. He and my brother were always working on cars in our driveway. When the dealer received a car he thought my Dad would like he'd give him a call. I remember a few times Dad getting us out of bed and taking us for a test drive.  We thought it was fun trucking around town in our pyjamas. 


My grandparent's car


Sometimes the car would be for Mom, and the best was when we all took a spin in what would become our first station wagon. My brothers and I slept often in that vehicle... at late-night drive-ins, at house parties my parents attended, and on long road trips. That was the vehicle Mom drove when we went to the cottage for the summer.  One year my parents had bought ducks to keep at the lake and they were in a cardboard box at my brother's feet in the front seat.  Every time we stopped at a light or to get gas, one of the ducks would stick his head out the hole in the top of the box and quack until we started rolling again. 








Relevant Links


















Related Post:  Automobile Registration





Sunday, 15 October 2017

Canada 150 - McGill Normal School







During our country's 150th anniversary celebration of confederation I will write posts titled Canada 150 with a link to a publication or website I find that may help you tell the story of your Canadian ancestors.
Click on the Canada 150 label on the right or at the bottom to see all the posts.

Today I have for you...



McGill Normal School 




The Normal School was designed to train teachers, and set teaching standards. The Montreal school was open from 1857-1907 when it merged into the School for Teachers at Macdonald College.  One of the conditions of entrance into the school, was to teach for at least three years after graduating. For more information, read the pdf about the History of the McGill Normal School. Records are held at the archives of McGill University. The school was located in Montreal on Belmont Street. 

"From 1857-1907 the McGill Normal School trained 2,989 teachers, to whom were issued 4,118 diplomas - 300 of academy grade, 1,452 of model school grade, 33 kindergarten and 2,333 elementary school diplomas."
Mary Ann (Annie) Lyons was my 1st cousin 2x removed (daughter of my 2x great grandfather's sister) and she graduated from the McGill Normal School. She received an Elementary Diploma in 1903, then went on to get a Model Diploma in 1906. In 1907 Annie enrolled at the Alberta College in Edmonton. 

On the webpage for the list of graduates, click to open and/or download the excel file. Also check other links on right column.

The McGill University Prospectus covering the years the Normal School was open, has a list of staff, instructors and professors for the Normal School.  Further back are names of graduates, but not for the Normal School... drat!




The McGill University yearbooks only start at 1898, so if you have an ancestor that graduated before then, you will most likely find his name in one of these calendars, that seem to start about 1861. 



Relevant Links





Friday, 13 October 2017

High Fives - October 13, 2017



High Fives are articles or blog posts I have read during the week that I find interesting, and perhaps are pertinent to my research. Sometimes there are only a couple and sometimes there are quite a few.





~by DiAnn Iamarino Ohama at Fortify Your Family Tree
It is said our Falconer ancestors descend from Walter of Lonkyir, His son Ranulfus became the falconer to the king, and thus became Ranulfus Falconer.



~by Michael John Neil at Genealogy Tip of the Day
I have found a few of these newspaper articles with no first name.  I can usually tell who it is by the date, the place and by others mentioned in the article. Not always!  Another place that just Miss or Mrs is used is in the directories.  At least with the Mrs they usually put widow of... 







For more exciting weekend reading, see what posts these bloggers liked...


Saturday – Gail Dever, Crème de la Crème


Sunday – Randy Seaver, Best of the Genea-Blogs






Wednesday, 11 October 2017

Canada 150 - Government Gazette of Vancouver Island






During our country's 150th anniversary celebration of confederation I will write posts titled Canada 150 with a link to a publication or website I find that may help you tell the story of your Canadian ancestors.
Click on the Canada 150 label on the right or at the bottom to see all the posts.

Today I have for you...


Government Gazette, Vancouver Island
1864-1866






On May 17, 1864 the first issue of the Government Gazette for Vancouver Island was published. It was two pages. 

In 1864-1865 there were extra editions to publish the Assessment Roll. Some land owners didn't even live on the Island...






From 1864-1866 there were published extra editions for Assessment of Trade Licenses...






The issue for February 4, 1865 gave list of road improvements PLUS names of settlers for the districts of Cowichan, Nanaimo and Comox







Relevant Links








Related Post:  Gleanings from the Gazette



Sunday, 8 October 2017

Canada 150 - Canadian Baptists






During our country's 150th anniversary celebration of confederation I will write posts titled Canada 150 with a link to a publication or website I find that may help you tell the story of your Canadian ancestors.
Click on the Canada 150 label on the right or at the bottom to see all the posts.

Today I have for you...


Canadian Baptists







Look for lists of members of the church, and other ancestors mentioned in these publications...






Relevant Links


















Friday, 6 October 2017

High Fives - October 6, 2017




High Fives are articles or blog posts I have read during the week that I find interesting, and perhaps are pertinent to my research. Sometimes there are only a couple and sometimes there are quite a few.





~by Alison Ensign at Family Search Blog
Indexing is one way everyone with a computer can give back. It is easily done and no special skills are needed, other than reading sometimes old script or faded records. It is fascinating to read some of the records you come across. You get to choose what records you want to index, and there is a good support team behind you if you run into a snag. Try it!! 


~by Anne Morddel at The French Genealogy Blog
I like Anne’s style of writing. She is very descriptive!
This goes to show that you can find information in unlikely places. Who’d have thought you can find a research guide for Guadeloupe on a blog from France?


~by Marian B. Wood at Climbing My Family Tree
Excellent reminder!  If the heirloom was not made by an ancestor, you can still write about how they came to possess it and why it was so precious to her/him.


~by Gail Dever at Genealogy à la carte
This is one thing I have yet to do, since I live far from any archives I need. 
It is time for me to dive in too, perhaps by email! These tips will come in handy. 


~by John at John Grenham – Irish Roots
John’s comment about the baptismal entries stuck with me as I read the entry for a cousin’s ancestor… instead of writing illegitimate as most do, the person wrote “base born”.
It can be anywhere from amusing to hilarious finding skeletons on the outlying branches of one’s tree, but what about when it hits closer to home?



~by DiAnn Iamarino Ohama at Fortify Your Family Tree
I have never used the Task List on FTM, I think I’ll start now. 
DiAnn is new to blogging this year, check out her other posts with great tips for genealogy
research. 
I especially like the one from September 19th for mapping where all your ancestors lived with My Maps on Google.   







For more exciting weekend reading, see what posts these bloggers liked...

Saturday – Gail Dever, Crème de la Crème

Sunday – Randy Seaver, Best of the Genea-Blogs




Wednesday, 4 October 2017

Canada 150 - Dry Goods Review






During our country's 150th anniversary celebration of confederation I will write posts titled Canada 150 with a link to a publication or website I find that may help you tell the story of your Canadian ancestors.
Click on the Canada 150 label on the right or at the bottom to see all the posts.

Today I have for you...


The Canadian Dry Goods Review






There are twelve months of issues in one volume.  Look for personal column, and business changes column in each issue. Published in Toronto, but for all of Canada.






And....  a French version published in Montreal.

Tissus et nouveauts







Relevant Links

Style: Dry Goods Review 1891-1922

Tissus et nouveauts 1900-1913






Tuesday, 3 October 2017

Above and Beyond at Find A Grave



I talked about Find A Grave before in my post on Burials.  I  know there have been issues with people who are less kindly-volunteers and more on-a-mission-rack-up-the-numbers types.  But today I have to tell you about a true volunteer who went above and beyond for me.


This volunteer does not live in the town in England where I requested a gravestone photo.  He is retired and likes to roam around the country visiting cemeteries and takes a lot of photos, especially of war graves. He was passing through my ancestors town and claimed my request so he could fulfill it.
This is what he found there.  




It was so overgrown! He said that over the winter this vegetation would all die off and in the spring he would go back, as it would be easier to clear and take photos.

Well, today I got another email from him and he said he is not as patient as I.  He was taking photos at another cemetery and took a route home that would pass this cemetery.  With "vegetation removal tools" in hand, he cleared all around the gravesite.



Now he was able to take close-up photos from every angle, as suggested by the Family Tree Blog that I mentioned in my High Fives post last Friday. He even took a photo of the side that is blank, just to show that it was.  

That is above and beyond and I am ever grateful, as I am for all the volunteers who take the time to help out people like me that live in a different city, a different country, a different continent!!  

It is sad that some cemeteries are left to go to seed, the inhabitants long forgotten. Perhaps now, with more people researching their ancestors and looking for their final resting place, some of these cemeteries will get spruced up for the occasion.


   

The Gunsmith




My husband has a lot of interests. He was a scuba instructor, he liked ice climbing, camping and boating, and his passion was shooting. He belonged to the Dominion of Canada Rifle Association and was on the Canadian Bisley Team in the Queen's Prize full bore rifle shoot in 1986. He didn't win but he did okay and he found it exciting just to be at such a prestigious shoot, with people from all over the world. He still has a varied collection of firearms, makes his own ammo and heads out to the shooting range every once in a while. 




One thing he was not interested in.... my hobby of genealogy.   

That is until I started researching his family and discovered his ancestor was an armorer. 
Nicholas Juchereau, besides taking care of the Quebec holdings of his uncle, Noel Juchereau, sieur des Chastelets, was a distinguished captain of the Régiment de Carignan-Salières and it was his duty to arm his men. So while in France in 1645 he chose Jacques Nolin as his armurier. His duty was to make and repair all weaponry, including firearms. 

Now I piqued my husband's interest, and it only got better when he learned Jacques' great-grandson went on to become a well-respected fur trader. 



Check your local library or archives for lists of gun makers, like the 1967 book on Colonial Australian Gunsmiths and for rifle associations.

Another place to check is the Patent office for firearms, rifles, etc.. 




Relevant Links


The Book of Rifles (1948) Smith

American Gun Makers, 1953

The Modern Gunsmith, Vol 1 & 2

Firearms in American history, 1900s


Hints on the use and handling of firearms generally, the revolver in particular 1885







Sunday, 1 October 2017

Canada 150 - New Brunswick and PEI Almanac






During our country's 150th anniversary celebration of confederation I will write posts titled Canada 150 with a link to a publication or website I find that may help you tell the story of your Canadian ancestors.
Click on the Canada 150 label on the right or at the bottom to see all the posts.

Today I have for you...




McMillan's Agricultural and Nautical Almanac for NB and PEI





Includes schools, societies, churches, militia etc, plus who's who in each county.







Relevant Links