Friday, 18 August 2017

High Fives - August 18, 2018




High Fives are articles or blog posts I have read during the week that I find interesting, and perhaps are pertinent to my research. Sometimes there are only a couple and sometimes there are quite a few.



Back in Hot Water
~by John at John Grenham - Irish Roots
If your British ancestor was a plantation owner, this post would interest you.


~by Lisa Louise Cooke at Genealogy Gems
Good advice on keeping your tree and media safe. 


~by Alexandra Mendez-Diez at Family History Daily
Also High Five to industrious people who create websites that make it easier to find our ancestors. Alexandra tells of a website that provides a database to find your American or Canadian ancestor that was affected by a disaster. You can search by name, or browse by disaster, year, state or province. Try it! Fabulous!


~by Library and Archives Canada Blog
Visits by the Queen Mother to Canada


Scotlander travel bloggers take on an epic Outlander challenge
~by History Scotland
Follow group of Scottish travel bloggers on August 26th as they take up the challenge to visit nearly 30 filming locations of Outlander in 34 hours!








Sunday, 13 August 2017

On Vacation - again







This week I am away visiting family and doing research. 
And... I have something very special in store.


I will be back next week to tell you all about it.



Canada 150 - New Brunswick






During our country's 150th anniversary celebration of confederation I will write posts titled Canada 150 with a link to a publication or website I find that may help you tell the story of your Canadian ancestors.
Click on the Canada 150 label on the right or at the bottom to see all the posts.

Today I have for you...





Province of New Brunswick 







New Brunswick was established as a separate province August 16, 1784. It was one of the four original provinces to join to form the Dominion of Canada in 1867.



Relevant links

History of New Brunswick 1825

History of New Brunswick since it's Settlement 1846

McMillan's Almanac for New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island






Friday, 11 August 2017

High Fives - August 11, 2017




High Fives are articles or blog posts that I read during the week and that I find interesting. Sometimes there are only a couple and sometimes there are quite a few.



New Uploads to Help Find an Orphaned Heir in Paris
~by Anne Morddel at The French Genealogy Blog
I got hits on a couple of my surnames, now to see if they take me anywhere.


~by John at John Grenham – Irish Roots
Ooooo-kay! I guess I'm not the only one that's been there done that!



~by Valmay at FIBIS – Families in British India Society
If you have British ancestors that lived in India you may want to follow this blog and check out their databases.

Wednesday, 9 August 2017

Canada 150 - Post Offices and Letter Carriers







During our country's 150th anniversary celebration of confederation I will write posts titled Canada 150 with a link to a publication or website I find that may help you tell the story of your Canadian ancestors.
Click on the Canada 150 label on the right or at the bottom to see all the posts.

Today I have for you...



Post Offices of Canada





This gazetteer, printed in Montreal, has location of all post offices in Canada in 1872.

Check local libraries and historical societies for Letter Carrier Souvenir Books, put out by the Federated Association of Letter Carriers. 




Relevant Links











Related Post:  The Post Office



Tuesday, 8 August 2017

Emigrant Aid Societies




In the 1800s when more and more people were emigrating from Great Britain to Canada, Australia, the United States and beyond, Emigrant Societies were founded to help emigrants with passage, and/or to help them once they got to their destination.







The Montreal Emigrant Society was founded in 1831 to help with passage, housing, food and jobs to immigrants from Ireland and Great Britain. Often once landed in Montreal, they were given aid to settle elsewhere in Canada. 





You can search the nominal database at LAC, read all the directions as images with a higher resolution are on a different site.

The Irish Emigrant Society of New York was founded in 1841. You can read a 1938 article about it at JSTOR by registering for freeThe Emigrant Savings Bank was established in 1850 by members of the Irish Emigrant Society and some of the records can be found on Ancestry. You can read about it there without signing up.  The savings bank records can also be seen at some libraries, including Library of Congress... see WorldCat for locations.

Check libraries and historical societies (where your ancestors came from as well as where they settled) for account books of local emigrant aid societies.


Relevant Links














Related Posts:  Immigrants



Sunday, 6 August 2017

Canada 150 - Railway and Marine World





During our country's 150th anniversary celebration of confederation I will write posts titled Canada 150 with a link to a publication or website I find that may help you tell the story of your Canadian ancestors.
Click on the Canada 150 label on the right or at the bottom to see all the posts.

Today I have for you...



Canadian Transport
The Railway and Marine World




Index at beginning of each year has names under Appointments and Biographical. There are names throughout but especially look for personals, birthday list every month's issue, and a section titled "Mainly About People".






Relevant Links




Friday, 4 August 2017

High Fives - August 4, 2017





~by Ada McVean at McGill Office for Science and Society
Hysteria was the diagnosis for everything that men could not understand about women.


~by A. Roger Ekirch at Academic Room
Took me a while to track down this original paper, which has been repeated by various others on the internet. Interesting concept that people used to sleep in two chunks, not straight through the night. 


~by Pad Kumlertsakul at The National Archives Blog
I had no idea Siam was in WWI. Though it is now Thailand, it was Siam on a small old globe I used to have.



~by Matthew Wills at JSTOR Daily
About the 1927 case of Buck v. Bell 


~ by Joe Buggy at Townland of Origin
Are your Irish ancestors in their database or in the next volumes?


~by Anne Morddel at The French Genealogy Blog
Researching in France into the 20th century.




Wednesday, 2 August 2017

Canada 150 - The Kilties Band





During our country's 150th anniversary celebration of confederation I will write posts titled Canada 150 with a link to a publication or website I find that may help you tell the story of your Canadian ancestors.
Click on the Canada 150 label on the right or at the bottom to see all the posts.

Today I have for you...



The Kilties Band


Kilties Band of Belleville, Ontario 1902-1933


The Kilties were a well known Scottish band and choir based in Belleville, Ontario. They toured around Canada, the United States and Europe, even giving a performance for the King. 

This souvenir album is full of songs, some I remember as favourites of my grandfather.
There are many photos of the band members. If you know who the gentlemen are in the photos, you can write it in the comments below.

Since the band went to Europe 1904-1905 I checked passenger lists, and sure enough, they are listed coming home through Quebec City on the Kensington on 18 June 1905. The ships information is on page 1019, and the Kiltie passengers and their families are on pages 1032-1033.





You can also check border crossings for when they toured the US. 
Was your ancestor a Kiltie?


Relevant Links









Tuesday, 1 August 2017

Publications of the Armed Forces



The Maple Leaf was a newspaper for the Canadian Armed Forces stationed overseas during WWII. There are not many copies of the first years editions, though some may be found in libraries. Issues from January 1944 to May 1946 are available online.

At the end of the war they printed The Maple Leaf Souvenir Album containing a few of the top stories, photos and articles. I uploaded to my drive some pages that contain names of photos. One of these days I will scan them all in. 




Some of the publications have lists of births, marriages and deaths...






Relevant Links



















Sunday, 30 July 2017

Canada 150 - Mining in BC






During our country's 150th anniversary celebration of confederation I will write posts titled Canada 150 with a link to a publication or website I find that may help you tell the story of your Canadian ancestors.
Click on the Canada 150 label on the right or at the bottom to see all the posts.

Today I have for you...


British Columbia Mining Record




I once had a neighbour who was well into her 80s and she used to tell me stories about her grandfather who was given passage, along with other men, to come from England to Vancouver Island to work in the coal mines.  When they arrived there were shacks built for them to live in and and a store of food to last until their first pay. 

Besides illustrations and maps, check for names of mining recorders and assayers.




My husband is a geologist and he had 2 mine claims in 1989 which he let lapse in 2000. If you think your ancestor had a mine claim, you can do a search at BC Mineral Titles Online. You can do a Title Search by name (make sure you check this option) and click on Client Details - the results will tell you how many claims that person had, and you can click on that to see them.




In the mid 1800s there were two major gold rushes in the BC interior. Silver and copper were also popular ores being mined in BC. 



Relevant Links







Friday, 28 July 2017

High Fives - July 28, 2017




~by John at John Grenham – Irish Roots
Finding your British ancestor in Ireland records and v v


~by Donna Moughty at Donna’s Irish Genealogy Resources
No Seale ancestors in defaulters list.  Phew!
But whooohoooo lots of Seale ancestors in the rate books!


~b Jessica Latinović at Ancestry Blog
Submit your story to Ancestry to be in a commercial



Thursday, 27 July 2017

You Never Know Where You'll Find a Treasure




This is a photo I recently acquired of my 2x great grandparents, Alexander and Margaret (Bruce) Mavor, who immigrated from Scotland before 1859. After working and growing their family on Ile aux Reaux, next to Grosse Ile, they eventually settled in Waterville, Compton Quebec...




Did I get this photograph from an aunt? A cousin? Some other family member?
No.
I got this photo, along with other family photos and papers, from the great granddaughter of the brother of the guy that married my great grandfather's sister. That's right!

If on Ancestry I had not entered and researched my 2nd great aunt Jean's husband's family I never would have come across some photos that were posted of their house. I contacted the person that uploaded them and we got to chatting. We swapped info and she uploaded this photo for me that was in a box of photos and papers she inherited.

She also uploaded this letter, written by the Prime Minister of Canada Louis St Laurent to my Aunt Jean,and talking about his "old friend", my 2x great grandfather Alexander Mavor and mentions his working for Dr (George Mellis) Douglas who was a doctor at Grosse Ile. Too bad she does not have the photo he mentioned in the letter.




There was also a rather long announcement of Jean's wedding, naming all the out of town guests.  There I discovered clues of where to look for a couple of ancestors I had previously lost track of, and finding them led me to others.

I am eternally grateful.

If you can't find what you want from your immediate family, try going further out of the circle. You never know where you will find a treasure!





Wednesday, 26 July 2017

Canada 150 - Medical Journals of Canada






During our country's 150th anniversary celebration of confederation I will write posts titled Canada 150 with a link to a publication or website I find that may help you tell the story of your Canadian ancestors.
Click on the Canada 150 label on the right or at the bottom to see all the posts.

Today I have for you...


Canadian Medical Journals




Look for names in the news, obituaries, association members, personals and contributors to articles.






Medical cases, treatments and some images.




Relevant Links







Tuesday, 25 July 2017

The Doomsday Book




I'm sure most people researching their ancestors in England have heard of the Doomsday Book. The Doomsday Book is a work written in Latin, completed in 1086 by order of King William the Conqueror to make a "great survey" (like a census) of properties and holdings in 31 counties of England tax assessment purposes. You have probably seen references to it in histories of places.




Since this ancient book can no longer be consulted by the public it has been made available online and searchable by place at the Open Doomsday site, built by Anna Powell-Smith. They also uploaded the pages to Internet Archive by county.

At Open Doomsday when you do a search your results will give you a translation of the latin text, an image of the original text plus a link to the whole page.

I did a search for the village of Loddiswell, situated on the River Avon in Devon, and where I find my King ancestors in the 1700s. I learn that Lodeswille was a sizable village of 44 households: 20 of villagers, 10 of smallholders, 8 of slaves and 6 of cottagers. There were 12 ploughlands and 10 plough teams, 1 cob (horse), 4 cattle, 6 pigs, 42 sheep and 11 goats. Other resources consisted of 1 lord's land, 13 acres of meadow, half a league of pasture land, 1 league of woodland, and 1 fishery.




It was deemed to be taxed very low for its size at 2 geld units. A unit is described as a hide, which is a measure of land of about 120 acres, thought sufficient to support one household. In 1086 the Lord and tenant-in-chief was Iudhael of Totnes.

When writing about your ancestors, include the history of where they lived.



Relevant Links

Doomsday Book info at Wikipedia

Doomsday Book at National Archive

Open Doomsday

Hull Doomsday Project

Doomsday Book at Internet Archive

Doomsday Book Glossary

The Doomsday Book Online (info)




Monday, 24 July 2017

No Luck of the Irish 3




There have been more publications for Ireland uploaded to Internet Archive and to HathiTrust. These have to do with public records and chancery reports.


In the rolls of chancery, there are two indexes in the back, index nominum (names) and index locorum (places).





In the publication The Jurist are Encumbered Estate Court Records. According to Wikipedia the Encumbered Estate Court...
" ..was established by an act of parliament in 1849 to facilitate the sale of Irish estates whose owners, because of the great famine, were unable to meet their obligations. It was given authority to sell estates on application from either the owner or an encumbrancer (somebody who had a claim on it) and, after the sale, distribute the proceeds among the creditors, granting clear title to the new owners. In 1858, the court's functions were assumed by the Landed Estates Court, later replaced by the Land Commission under the 1881 land act."




Relevant links

















Related Posts: No Luck of the IrishNo Luck of the Irish 2Irish Constabulary Resources

Also click label Ireland



Sunday, 23 July 2017

Canada 150 - Illustrated Atlas of Prince Edward Island






During our country's 150th anniversary celebration of confederation I will write posts titled Canada 150 with a link to a publication or website I find that may help you tell the story of your Canadian ancestors.
Click on the Canada 150 label on the right or at the bottom to see all the posts.

Today I have for you...


Illustrated Historical Atlas of ...Prince Edward Island


1880


This is more than an atlas, filled with cadastres, portraits, and drawings of residences.




There are a few places online to view this Atlas.  At Island Imagined where there is a list of what is on each page, Internet Archive (not very good quality of some images), and David Rumsey Map Collection.

At Rumsay maps, to get back to main page after viewing a page full screen, top right click back to media, then click Related (105). It shows 50 page thumbnails on a page.



Relevant Links




  


Related post:  History of PEI and Censuses




Friday, 21 July 2017

High Fives - July 21, 2017




~by Nancy Loe at Sassy Jane Genealogy
Also some postcards from Canada and other countries.


~by Jen Thorpe at Family Tree
There but for the grace of God goes my husband who did two tours as a marine in Vietnam. Still so many soldiers unaccounted for!!



~by the UK Heritage Lottery Fund
Maybe more organizations should get their local youth involved.
Related to this, last February the Minister for Arts and Heritage of Ireland launched an online toolkit for schools to encourage students to learn about their family history. It is also great for genealogists learning to research in Ireland.




Wednesday, 19 July 2017

Canada 150 - Séminaire de Québec





During our country's 150th anniversary celebration of confederation I will write posts titled Canada 150 with a link to a publication or website I find that may help you tell the story of your Canadian ancestors.
Click on the Canada 150 label on the right or at the bottom to see all the posts.

Today I have for you...


Séminaire de Québec




The Grand Séminaire de Québec was founded in 1663 to prepare young men for ordination and ministry in parishes and missions as far away as Louisiana.



The Petit Séminaire de Québec was founded in 1668 and serves as a secondary school, preparing students to enter the grand seminaire.




Relevant Links

Catalogue des officiers et les élèves du Séminaire de Québec