Friday, 21 July 2017

High Fives - July 21, 2017




~by Nancy Loe at Sassy Jane Genealogy
Also some postcards from Canada and other countries.


~by Jen Thorpe at Family Tree
There but for the grace of God goes my husband who did two tours as a marine in Vietnam. Still so many soldiers unaccounted for!!



~by the UK Heritage Lottery Fund
Maybe more organizations should get their local youth involved.
Related to this, last February the Minister for Arts and Heritage of Ireland launched an online toolkit for schools to encourage students to learn about their family history. It is also great for genealogists learning to research in Ireland.




Wednesday, 19 July 2017

Canada 150 - Séminaire de Québec





During our country's 150th anniversary celebration of confederation I will write posts titled Canada 150 with a link to a publication or website I find that may help you tell the story of your Canadian ancestors.
Click on the Canada 150 label on the right or at the bottom to see all the posts.

Today I have for you...


Séminaire de Québec




The Grand Séminaire de Québec was founded in 1663 to prepare young men for ordination and ministry in parishes and missions as far away as Louisiana.



The Petit Séminaire de Québec was founded in 1668 and serves as a secondary school, preparing students to enter the grand seminaire.




Relevant Links

Catalogue des officiers et les élèves du Séminaire de Québec









Monday, 17 July 2017

Life in Fife


My Lamont (Lawmonth, Lamount) ancestors lived in Largo, Fife, Scotland. John Lawmonth wrote in his diaries of the goings on in Fife and mentions many of our ancestors of the time. The original diary went from 1641 but the first and last bits seem to be long missing, now chronicling from 1649 to 1671. Various references hint that the original went longer than 1671, perhaps to his death around 1675. It was first published as The Chronicles of Fife in 1810, and a later edition in 1830, titled The Diary of John Lamont of Newton (though later proved it was the uncle John Lamont, not his nephew in Newton). He apparently left blank space after each entry so he could add facts later. Many other works of history of Fife refer to facts in the Chronicles.

Not only will you read about life in Fife but you will find entries like this one...


1649, Mar - There was an insurrection in the north parts of this kingdom, so that the garrison of Endernesse (Inverness) was surprised, and the walls of the town thrown down; and upon this, David Lesley went north with some troops of horse, and foot, to surprise them. In May 1649, following, there was 800 men taken prisoners, among whom was the Lord Rea, and some other gentlemen of the name of MacKenzie (who where carried to Edinburgh) and some killed. Upon this overthrow, the rest laid down their arms, so that their lives and fortunes were granted to them, which was done.1649, Mar - My Lord Scotstaruet bought Inchekeith (Fife) from my Lord Glams, and a mill of Kinghorn, with some acres of land there about; the whole bargain amounted to twenty thousand mark Scots money, or thereby.


... and John's version of an obituary!


"1661, August 6 - Sir Alexander Gibson, the Laird of Dury, in Fife, departed out of this life at Dury, about the 32 year of his age. He died of a purple fever, within 12 or 14 days, and was interred in Scoonie Kirk, the 16 of August, being Friday, in the day time. He left no sons behind him, but only two daughters, (the youngest died shortly after,) and his lady with child, which was a daughter also. His brother John did succeed to the estate in April of 1662. In July 1662, thereafter, his lady left Dury, and went to Nuthill, her brother Stormont's house near Falkland; and about the same time, his brother gave up housekeeping at Dury, and went to stay at Edb (Edinburgh). He was served heir to his brother at Cuper the 5 of August 1662; also, August 6,1667, the deseaced Sir Alexander Gibson his lady, surnamed Murray, departed out of this life at Perth, of a purple fever also."


This is an interesting excerpt from The East Neuk of Fife - a tavern bill in Largo..



I am related to the Lamonts through Katherine Lamont (daughter of Dr Andrew Lamont) who married my goldsmith James Tait in 1731.

If your ancestors lived in Fife you may find them mentioned in the pages of the following books.



Relevant Links

John Lamont – Dictionary of National Biography, Vol 32, pg 28








Register of the minister, elders, and deacons of the Christian congregation of St. Andrews, comprising the proceedings of the Kirk session and of the Court of the Superintendent of Fife, Fothrik, and Strathearn... 







Sunday, 16 July 2017

Canada 150 - Canadian Sovereignty in the High Arctic






During our country's 150th anniversary celebration of confederation I will write posts titled Canada 150 with a link to a publication or website I find that may help you tell the story of your Canadian ancestors.
Click on the Canada 150 label on the right or at the bottom to see all the posts.

Today I have for you...


Canadian Sovereignty in the High Arctic 


Canada Government Expedition 1908-1909


Arctic Expedition 1908-1909, Joseph-Elzear Bernier affirms Canadian sovereignty in the High Acrtic by erecting a plaque on Melville Island – list of crew members, copies of found documents left by Perry in 1820 and Kellett in 1854, and area of land annexed to Canada.
Photos, portraits and drawings.




Arctic expedition 1910-1911Joseph-Elzear Bernier, officer in charge. Many portraits, photos and maps, plus a list of crew members.





Throughout the book are names of local people who helped the crew and some served as guides...





Relevant Links











Friday, 14 July 2017

High Fives - July 14, 2017




~by Serge Durflinger at Legion Magazine
For my friend whose grand uncle died during battle of Hill 70.


~by Chris Paton at The Genes Blog
Hmmmm I wonder which of those houses belonged to my Tait ancestors ?? Love this!
Here is the direct link. I also downloaded the free app to my iPad.


How I Created a Genealogy Timeline to Show my Grandfather’s Life
~by Diane Haddad at Genealogy Insider
What a great idea to incorporate a timeline in a family book! Next time.


~by Anne Morddel at French Genealogy Blog
This was in fact applicable in other countries. Info on Britain births at sea or abroad can be found here.
For Canada the Dept of National Defence at one time issued certificates for births abroad so there may be some records around, but they ceased this practice.


~by Diane L Richard at UpFront with NGS
I have often found useful documents or info in LAC's magazine Signatures
Anyone doing research should subscribe to the magazine put out by their archives. 



Wednesday, 12 July 2017

Canada 150 - The Twelfth





During our country's 150th anniversary celebration of confederation I will write posts titled Canada 150 with a link to a publication or website I find that may help you tell the story of your Canadian ancestors.
Click on the Canada 150 label on the right or at the bottom to see all the posts.

Today I have for you...


The Twelfth, also called Orangemen's Day



The Twelfth of July is the day celebrating the Glorious Revolution and the victory of the Protestant king William of Orange over the Catholic king James II at the Battle of the Boyne. The battle took place across the River Boyne near the town of Drogheda in the east of Ireland.

The Orange Order is headed by the Grand Orange Order of Ireland, established in 1798, and which records the first parade as having been held in 1791.

According to the Grand Orange Lodge of Canada, "Most historians agree that Orangemen were in Canada previous to 1812 and by 1822 the 12th Parade in Toronto had become the most popular event of the day."






Friday, 7 July 2017

High Fives - July 7, 2017





There is no High Fives post this week, as I am away visiting family.
Thank you

We will be back next week with more High Fives!

Saturday, 1 July 2017

On Vacation







There will be no posts until after July 8th, as I am on vacation.

I am visiting grandchildren and telling them about their ancestors.


Use the Blog Archive to the right to look up what I posted other years at this time, or browse the subject labels. 


Thank you.



150 Years of Confederation




Today I have for you....


A Proclamation for uniting the Provinces of Canada, Nova Scotia, and New Brunswick, into one Dominion, under the name of ...

CANADA





Not everyone was convinced that Canada could survive on it's own, as written by various groups, including two men of the British Military. Second Captain Edward Chichester Bolton and Lieutenant Horace Hervey Webber of the Royal Artillery set out to prove that a united Canada would not work...




Being military, their main reason was that the country was so situated that Canada could not properly defend it's shores. They included a map of the Canadian Frontier, east of the Great Lakes, for show-and-tell...



Note the "Uninhabitable Forest"?  I used to live in there, right around the U in Uninhabitable!



Relevant Links


CANADA a Proclamation: Canada Gazette 1 July 1867



(Counter-poison: Confederation is the salvation of Lower Canada; It is necessary to distrust the enemies of the confederation)






Related Post:  Oh Canada